All posts by AIHC Home Health Blog

Alzheimer's Wandering: How to Maintain Safety at Home

Alzheimer’s wandering is not uncommon in the early and middle stages of the disease.

When a loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, families typically have an abundance of questions about care, disease management and changes in behavior that can be expected. One of the most concerning behaviors that families may face is the tendency to wander. While not uncommon, Alzheimer’s wandering often occurs in the early to middle stages of the disease and can be challenging for family caregivers and place the individual with dementia in unsafe situations. While anyone with dementia is at risk to wander, often the behavior is brought about by:

  • Basic needs. Your loved one is hungry, thirsty or needs to use the bathroom.
  • Following past routines. He or she may be trying to go to work, to school or to the store.
  • Searching. Your loved one may be searching for something or someone.
  • Stress or fear. Wandering is often brought about as a reaction to stress, fear or nervousness.

To help prevent wandering, the Florida in-home care experts at American, Advocate, Douglas and Whitsyms In-Home Care recommend implementing a daily, structured routine, including regular meals, exercise, plenty of hydration and bathroom breaks. It’s also a helpful idea to keep a diary and note the time of day or any potential triggers that seem to proceed wandering. If a loved one feels disoriented or abandoned, provide calm reassurance that he or she is safe.
Other ways to ensure the safety of a loved one who may wander include:

  • Camouflage doors. Paint or wallpaper doors to match the surrounding walls, hang curtains, or conceal exits with folding barriers. Hang a “NO EXIT” or “DO NOT ENTER” sign on doors.
  • Install a security system or alarms on doors. A whole-house security system can be set up to chime when doors or windows are opened. Childproof covers on doorknobs and bells hung on doors can also help alert family caregivers to wandering.
  • Keep car keys out of sight. If the senior with dementia is no longer driving, be sure to keep car keys hidden and in a secure location.
  • Provide supervision. Having someone at home with the senior loved one is ideal. The professional care providers we refer are highly trained in Alzheimer’s and dementia care and help provide families with peace of mind through compassionate care and enhanced safety.

Another important step for families to take is to have an emergency plan in place should their loved one wander.

  • Have a recent photo of your loved one on hand.
  • Keep a list of emergency numbers.
  • Alert neighbors and ask them to inform you if they see your loved one out alone.
  • Enroll your loved one a wandering response program.
  • Make a list of places the senior with dementia might go, including a former house, workplace or place of worship.
  • Place labels in the senior’s clothes, have him or her carry identification or wear a GPS device.

We know that Alzheimer’s and dementia impact each individual differently. To help meet the needs of local families, our referred care providers are experienced and trained in Alzheimer’s and dementia care and work to ensure the physical and emotional well-being of individuals in their care and reduce the risk for Alzheimer’s wandering. Whether implementing a structured, daily routine, engaging a loved one in reminiscing activities, helping prepare nutritious meals, assisting with personal care needs or a variety of other tasks, our referred care providers are available for a few hours each week, up to and including 24/7 live-in care.

To discover more about the ways our family of brands can help provide safety for a loved one with dementia or Alzheimer’s, select the location nearest you:

Reach out to us anytime to learn more about the professional Florida home care that families have trusted since 1992.

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

Physical Therapy for Seniors: Helping Older Adults Remain Active

Learn more about physical therapy’s benefits to seniors here.

October is National Physical Therapy Month, and the in-home care companies Floridians trust – American, Advocate, Douglas and Whitsyms In-Home Care, recommend helping the older adults in your life become more physically active (with doctor’s approval and exercise plan), and to engage the services of a physical therapist when warranted to improve quality of life and health.

Physical therapy is a great option for seniors who:

  • Are recovering from an accident, injury, or surgery, such as a fall or hip replacement. Physical therapy is a crucial component in recovery following hospitalization, helping seniors regain balance, flexibility, range of motion, strength, and endurance while reducing pain.
  • Have experienced a stroke. Physical therapy can help retrain the brain to utilize lost or compromised functionality, allowing seniors to regain use of muscles impacted by the stroke and increase independence.
  • Are enduring pain from conditions such as arthritis or osteoporosis. Extension exercises to improve posture, weight-bearing exercises, aquatic therapy, use of hot packs and ice, and many other techniques can help minimize pain and reduce the risk for falls.
  • Struggle with incontinence. A physical therapist can teach seniors exercises for the specific muscles that control urination, train on appropriate hydration and restroom planning, and more.
  • Simply want to improve balance. Balance problems in seniors are common, for a variety of reasons, and can be strengthened through physical therapy services that boost the many bodily functions that work together for balance.

Trusted by Florida families since 1992, our referred care providers can help seniors requiring physical therapy services in a variety of ways, including transportation to PT appointments, providing motivation to follow prescribed exercise plans, preparing healthy meals, or even simply providing friendly companionship and conversation to make each day the best it can be.
Learn more about our family of brands and the many ways we can help a Florida senior in your life. Click the link below for the location nearest your loved one:

Contact us today for more information about our referred care providers and make tomorrow a brighter day for a senior you love!

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

The Importance of Flu Shots for Seniors

Flu shots for seniors are more important than ever this year.

For seniors aged 65 years and older, there’s never a good time to get the flu. And this year, that’s especially true. With coronavirus cases still on the rise, it’s more important than ever for seniors to take steps to protect their health. One way to do this is to plan on getting the seasonal flu vaccine.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, between 50-70% of seasonal flu-related hospitalizations can be attributed to people who are 65 years of age or older. With many hospitals still struggling to meet the demands of COVID-19 positive patients, it’s easy to see how adding flu-related hospitalizations could make an already tenuous situation worse.
Mark Thompson, an epidemiologist in the Influenza Division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, states, "People who can avoid the flu will help reduce the burden on a U.S. health care system already overwhelmed by COVID-19.”

With this in mind, the Florida in-home care experts at American, Advocate, Douglas and Whitsyms In-Home Care provide the following three tips on the importance of getting a flu vaccine this year:

  1. Plan to get the vaccine early. Healthcare providers and many pharmacies offer the flu vaccine each year. Due to an anticipated increase in demand for the flu vaccine, it’s important to plan to get the vaccine as early as it’s available, which is typically September. This online resource provides information about local clinics that offer flu vaccines near you.
  2. Learn about the different types of flu vaccine. While the flu vaccine is approved for most people 6 months of age or older, there are different types of flu shots for specific age groups. Doctors typically recommend a high-dose vaccine or a vaccine made with adjuvant for anyone over the age of 65 years old.
  3. Be proactive and protect yourself. Because the immune system becomes weaker with age, it becomes difficult for the body to fight off infections like the flu, putting seniors at greater risk for serious complications and potential hospitalizations. Getting an annual flu shot is a proactive way to protect your health.

Flu shots for seniors are covered by Medicare and by most private insurance. For seniors who don’t have insurance, many pharmacies and clinics offer flu shots at very low cost.

A seasonal flu vaccine is an easy way to reduce or minimize the risk for the serious complications that can occur when older adults get the flu. Our experienced referred care providers can help provide transportation to ensure seniors are up-to-date on all of their vaccines, and can also help keep the home clean and sanitized and the refrigerator stocked with healthy food and snacks.

Discover more about the ways our family of brands can help promote optimum health for a senior you love, select the location nearest you:

Contact us any time for additional information on how our professional Florida Home Health Care Services can help keep seniors safe & healthy during Flu season and beyond.

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

Know the Facts About Seniors and Alzheimer’s Disease

Impacting over 5 million people in the U.S. alone, Alzheimer’s disease touches almost all of us in some way. Arm yourself with the facts you need about the disease in order to provide the best care for someone you love.

Receiving a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is devastating for both the senior diagnosed and his or her loved ones, and with millions of Americans given that diagnosis, it’s a disease that impacts so many of us. One of the most important steps we can all take is to learn as much as possible about Alzheimer’s, and since September is designated as World Alzheimer’s Month, it’s an ideal time for the Florida home care experts trusted by local families since 1992 – American, Advocate, Douglas and Whitsyms In-Home Care -- to share some facts to help you better assist a loved one with the disease.

What is Alzheimer’s disease? Alzheimer’s is a progressive form of dementia that impacts the areas of the brain responsible for memory, thinking, and language, making it increasingly difficult for a person with the disease to manage the daily activities of living. While the cause is still not fully understood, scientists believe it’s the result of a number of factors that could include age, family history, diet, environment, education, and more.

What are the symptoms of Alzheimer’s? One of the first signs is usually memory loss that initially displays through repeating statements or questions, getting lost, forgetting the names of common objects, etc. Other symptoms include difficulty with managing finances, completing once-familiar tasks, losing objects, decreased judgment, and mood or behavioral changes.

What should I do if I suspect Alzheimer’s in a loved one? It’s important to schedule an appointment with the senior’s doctor as soon as symptoms begin to become evident, as early diagnosis is crucial to starting treatment. There are also other conditions that mimic Alzheimer’s, which the doctor will want to check for as well.

What happens next? If the doctor confirms a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, treatment will be recommended to slow or delay the progression of the disease. While there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s, there are ways to help better manage the symptoms and retain mental functioning for as long as possible.

It’s important for family caregivers of a person diagnosed with Alzheimer’s to receive ongoing support and to take breaks as needed. Providing dementia care can take a toll on one’s health – both physically and emotionally. Utilizing respite care can help family caregivers take time away from caregiving responsibilities in order to prevent burnout, depression, and other serious health risks.

As the Florida home care experts, our referred care providers are always on hand to help those with Alzheimer’s and the families who love them. Through trusted, compassionate, and creative in-home care that eases some of the more challenging aspects of the disease, such as wandering, sundowning, agitation, aggression, and more, we provide the respite care family caregivers need to take much-needed breaks from care.

Discover more about our family of brands and how we can help. Simply select the location nearest you from these options:

Reach out to us today to learn more about how our referred care providers can help you and a loved one with Alzheimer’s to live the best possible quality of life.

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

Hurricane Preparedness for Seniors

hurricane preparedness for seniors

Hurricanes are incredibly destructive, with high winds that can tear structures apart and rainfall and storm surges that can cause significant flooding. People know when they live in a hurricane-prone area, and they will usually have some warning that a hurricane is coming, even though the course of a storm can sometimes curve unpredictably. This means that there is time to prepare – take advantage of that!

Seniors can have particular difficulty withstanding a hurricane. Evacuation can be especially difficult for seniors, many of whom can’t drive, or have mobility issues. Evacuation can be challenging emotionally for seniors as well.

Even though we have more sophisticated methods of predicting storms and their paths than ever before, it is often difficult for seniors to access information about a storm’s approach, and to prepare for it on their own.

Because of this, seniors in hurricane-prone areas should be aware of ways to prepare, and should make specific disaster-preparedness plans with their family members and caregivers.

Special Considerations

It is important to understand the difference between an advisory, a watch, and a warning. When dealing with weather events, forecasters use a three-tier system to let people know what risks they face.

  1. An Advisory simply means that hurricane-related weather might inconvenience people in an area or cause mild disruption.
  2. Watch means that there’s a high likelihood that a hurricane will strike in the area in the next two days, and works mostly as a suggestion to stay tuned to emergency bulletins.
  3. Warning means that there’s a very high likelihood that a hurricane will strike in the area in the next 36 hours, and means that you should probably prepare to evacuate.

Special Plans

To prepare for hurricane season, the best strategy is to do the most you can to prepare for the worst. This includes:

  1. Take an inventory of valuables in case the storm damages the home. This can be as simple as taking a video or pictures of your home’s interior using the camera on your phone.
  2. Make your home as weather-proof as possible, including cleaning out gutters and downspouts, and making sure sump pumps and other anti-flooding measures are in good condition. You may also want to make sure that valuable items and important documents are out of the range of any floodwaters. If seniors are unable to do these activities their your own, be sure that caregivers, family members, or friends help them prepare in this way.
  3. For your safety and comfort, have a disaster supplies kit packed and ready in one place before a disaster hits. Assemble enough supplies to last for at least three days. Store your supplies in one or more easy-to-carry containers, such as a backpack or duffel bag (seniors might want to consider storing supplies in a container that has wheels so that it is easy to carry)
  4. Keeping your kit up-to-date is also important. Review the contents at least every six months or as your needs change. Check expiration dates and shift your stored supplies into everyday use before they expire. Replace food, water and batteries, and refresh medications and other perishable items with “first in, first out” practices.
  5. Be ready to evacuate. Try to make your emergency preparedness kit is as portable as possible, and, if you have a car, always leave it with at least half a tank of gas during hurricane season to facilitate a quick getaway.
  6. Arrange for someone to check on you during the event of a disaster. Be sure to include any caregivers in your meeting and planning efforts.
  7. Carry family contact information in your wallet. Choose an out-of-town contact person. After a disaster, it is often easier to make a long-distance call than a local call from a disaster area.
  8. Keep copies of vital family records and other important documents such as birth and marriage certificates, social security cards, passports, wills, deeds, and financial, insurance and immunizations records in a safe location, like a fire safe or safe-deposit box
  9. Keep support items like wheelchairs and walkers in a designated place so they can be found quickly. This step is essential for those who have home-health caregivers, particularly for those who are bed bound.
  10. Label any equipment, such as wheelchairs, canes or walkers, that you would need with your name, address and phone numbers.

Heat In The Aftermath

A hurricane often brings hot, humid weather in its wake, and that can be dangerous if it’s coupled with a long-term power outage, because seniors often have particular difficulty coping with heat. Even if your home is intact and you haven’t been told to evacuate, a power outage could still happen, and might be a good reason to leave the area in order to avoid heat-related health problems.

Help Seniors Be Prepared

In summary, it can be hard for seniors to prepare for disasters on their own. It is essential, then, for seniors and the people who care for them to give a lot of thought to how best to respond to natural disasters. They should, ideally, plan and prepare for them far in advance. One thing that people can do to help is check in to make sure that seniors are aware of any potential threats and to encourage them to take appropriate action.

Meet with your family, friends, and caregivers frequently to explain your concerns and create a support network that can work as a team to prepare, and to respond in the event of a natural disaster.

For a complete guide on disaster-preparedness, we recommend utilizing this booklet from the Red Cross.

Partner with a Trusted In Home Care Provider

Trusted by Florida families for more than 25 years, American In Home Care’s credentialed caregivers can help support the hobbies, pastimes, and activities that our older adult clients enjoy. In addition to helping keep a senior loved one active and engaged, let us assist with light housekeeping, meal planning and preparation, and so much more.

To learn more about our comprehensive home care services, reach out to one of the four
offices conveniently located throughout the state:

Contact ustoday to learn more about how our professional Florida home care services can offer much needed companionship during the pandemic for a senior you love. We look forward to hearing from you!

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

Engaging Indoor Activities for Seniors at Home

These indoor activities for seniors can help keep your loved one active and engaged. Learn more from American In-Home Care, the Florida home care experts.

With COVID-19 cases continuing to rise in Florida and throughout the country, it’s clear that the safest place for older adults right now is at home. And while home does provide a necessary level of safety and security during the pandemic, it does put older adults at a heightened risk for feeling lonely and isolated.

To help seniors cope with the changes brought on by the pandemic, the Florida in-home care experts at American, Advocate, Douglas and Whitsyms In-Home Care share these indoor activities for seniors to help them remain engaged and active – in both mind and body.

Games and Puzzles
One of the many benefits of games and puzzles is that they often require critical and creative thinking skills, which helps keep the senior brain active and engaged.

  • Crossword puzzles – These can be found in books and newspapers and large print versions are available free, online.
  • Sudoku – These number puzzles are a great alternative to crossword puzzles. In addition to being available in books, try this free, online resource.
  • Card games – Go Fish, Blackjack, Crazy Eights, Solitaire and more are great games for seniors; all that is needed is a deck of cards. Or, download one of the many apps that will allow for electronic play.
  • Yahtzee – This classic dice game can be played solo, or with additional players. Try setting up a virtual game with a loved one by using an online conferencing app. This can be a great way for grandparents to interact with grandchildren who live out of the area.
  • Jigsaw puzzles – With thousands of choices of varying difficulties, jigsaw puzzles are a wonderful activity that can be completed over a period of time.

Virtual Visits
With only essential travel recommended for older adults, it’s easy for them to feel a little cabin fever. Thankfully, there are cultural sites all over the world that can be accessed right from the comforts of home.

  • The British Museum in London
  • Musée d’Orsay in Paris
  • National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.
  • The Georgia Aquarium
  • The San Diego Zoo

Learn Something New
If a senior loved one has ever been interested in learning a new skill, starting a new hobby or even resurrecting an old pastime, now is the perfect time to dive in. Encourage an older adult to:

  • Learn a new language or instrument.
  • Discover and create a family tree or write down details of the family history.
  • Try cooking new recipes.
  • Rediscover knitting, sewing, photography or another hobby that’s been put aside over the years.
  • Grow vegetables or herbs in small pots and use them when cooking.

Stay Active
In addition to increasing physical strength, adding exercise to a daily routine can help improve mood, which is especially important when there are stressful things occurring that may be out of one’s control, like the pandemic. Advocate for a senior loved one to:

  • Take a walk several times each day around the block or go for a walk at a local park.
  • Add strength training to the daily routine. If hand weights aren’t available, use water bottles or cans of food.
  • Try a new exercise by watching a YouTube video: chair yoga, Tai Chi, and more.
  • Do gentle stretching and balance exercises to help maintain mobility.

Partner with a Trusted In Home Care Provider
Trusted by Florida families for more than 25 years, American In Home Care’s credentialed caregivers can help support the hobbies, pastimes, and activities that our older adult clients enjoy. In addition to helping keep a senior loved one active and engaged, let us assist with light housekeeping, meal planning and preparation, and so much more.

To learn more about our comprehensive home care services, reach out to one of the four
offices conveniently located throughout the state:

Contact ustoday to learn more about how our professional Florida home care services can offer much needed companionship during the pandemic for a senior you love. We look forward to hearing from you!

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

The Importance of Annual Eye Exams for Seniors

The Importance of Annual Eye Exams for Seniors

August is National Eye Exam Month, and the personal care companies Floridians trust – American, Advocate, Douglas and Whitsyms In-Home Care, encourage you to use this time to focus on the eye health of the older adults in your life. Although there are some typical age-related changes that can naturally occur as we grow older, there are also a number of more serious conditions that need proper detection and treatment to protect seniors’ vision.
The American Optometric Association advises annual eye exams for seniors, along with additional exams scheduled immediately if any vision changes are noted.
In particular, your loved one’s eye doctor will want to keep an eye out for these conditions:

Cataracts: When the lens becomes cloudy, it blurs the vision and makes it particularly difficult to see when the light levels are low.

Glaucoma: With no obvious symptoms in the early stages, glaucoma needs to be detected through an eye exam early in order to prevent blindness. Those with a family history of glaucoma, as well as African Americans, are at a heightened risk for the disease.

AMD (Age-Related Macular Degeneration): As the name suggests, this disease affects the macula, which controls central vision. Peripheral (side) vision remains intact.

Retinal Detachment: A separation or tearing of the retina can occur from trauma, or from chronic conditions such as diabetes or inflammatory eye disorders, and can lead to blindness if left untreated.

Diabetic Retinopathy: As damaged blood vessels leak, the retinal tissues swell and impact vision. In the most severe cases, this can lead to blindness.
American In-Home Care is always available to help ensure seniors have safe, reliable transportation and accompaniment to medical appointments and procedures, along with a full range of Florida senior care services, provided in the comfort of home.
Learn more about our family of brands and rich history of serving seniors in Florida for more than 25 years with the exceptional care they need and deserve. Choose the location that’s closest to you from the four options below:

Contact us at your convenience to discover how our professional Florida senior care services can improve health, wellbeing, and quality of life for the older adults you love. Whether the need is for just a few hours of respite care each week, full-time, live-in care, or any of a number of options in between, we’ll create a plan of care that addresses your specific needs. We look forward to the opportunity to serve you!

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

Skin Cancer Prevention Tips for Seniors

Skin cancer prevention tips help enable seniors to enjoy the summer.

Ah, sunny Florida! As Floridians, we’re fortunate to have nearly perfect weather year-round. But along with the promise of a never-ending summer, we must also be extra vigilant about sun protection 365 days of the year. For older adults, this is especially important, as skin becomes more susceptible to sun damage with age. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that most cases of skin cancer are found in people 65 years of age or older.

Learn more about the importance of implementing sun protection steps into one’s everyday routine from the personal care companies Florida families trust – American, Advocate, Douglas and Whitsyms In-Home Care:

Sunscreen – Sunscreen is a first line of defense that should be used daily. Even when outside, but not in the direct sun, sunscreen with an SPF of 15 should be applied liberally to all areas of exposed skin and reapplied every few hours, and/or after swimming, perspiring, or toweling off. Most sunscreen has an expiration date, and the shelf life is approximately three years.

Hat and Protective Clothing – Wide-brimmed hats and long-sleeved pants and shirts can provide older adults with protection from the sun’s harmful UV rays. Tightly woven fabrics offer the best protection and darker colors may be more effective at blocking UV rays than lighter colored ones. Remember to protect ears and the back of the neck with sunscreen if a baseball cap is worn.

Sunglasses – To help protect eyes and the sensitive skin around them, wearing sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays is a must. Not only do they shield eyes from the sun, but also from glare, and sunglasses have been shown to reduce the risk of cataracts.

Shade – If you’re by a pool, at the beach, or having lunch on the patio, sitting under an umbrella, a tree, or other structure for shade is important. Not only will this provide protection from the sun’s damaging rays, but it will also help keep you cooler. Sunscreen and/or protective clothing should still be worn in the shade, and remember to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

In addition to including these skin cancer prevention tips into one’s daily routine, it’s important for older adults to conduct routine skin examinations and to visit a dermatologist at least once per year for a thorough examination of the skin. Having a dermatologist perform a skin exam is especially important if you or a senior loved one has mobility and flexibility issues, so that difficult to see areas of the skin are not overlooked. A family caregiver can also be enlisted to help. By taking proactive measures, skin cancer or suspected skin cancer can be caught and treated early. To perform a skin self-exam, the American Academy of Dermatology Association recommends the following steps:

  1. Use a full-length mirror to examine the front, back, and each side, with arms raised.
  2. Examine underarms, forearms and palms.
  3. Look at legs, between toes, and at the soles of the feet.
  4. Use a handheld mirror to examine the back of the neck and scalp.
  5. Use a handheld mirror to look at the back and buttocks.

By following these skin care prevention tips, it’s easy for Florida seniors to continue to enjoy the sun, and all our area has to offer. For additional ways to help a senior you love remain active and engaged, reach out to us to learn more about our professional and fully credentialed caregivers. From assisting with transportation for a regular outing with friends and help with personal care needs, to providing medication management and reminders, light housekeeping, and more, our referred care providers are here to help promote independence, safety and peace of mind.
Discover more about our family of brands and why we’ve been the trusted choice for in-home senior care in Florida for over 25 years. With offices conveniently located throughout the state, learn about the services and location nearest you:

Reach out to us today to learn more about in-home senior care in Florida and to get started with a professional care provider to meet the unique needs of your senior loved one.

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

Overcoming Objections to In-Home Care

Discover these useful tips to help older adults overcome common objections to having in-home care:

Life, naturally, changes as we grow older. Many of the day-to-day tasks and activities that once came easily can become challenging, and there comes a time when having some assistance at home helps restore safety and comfort, while maintaining independence and familiar routines. Yet for many older adults, the idea of accepting help at home is met with reluctance, for a variety of reasons.
Discover tips to overcome common objections to care in the home from the Florida in-home care experts at American, Advocate, Douglas and Whitsyms In-Home Care with these helpful strategies:

  • Perceived loss of independence. Second only to losing physical health, a recent study revealed that fear of lost independence is a top concern in seniors, and accepting the need for in-home care assistance may exacerbate that fear. It can help to remind seniors that an in-home care professional is never there to “take over,” but instead will offer whatever support is needed to enhance the senior’s independence and ability to remain living in the comfort of home. Seniors remain in charge, determining what activities to engage in, when to wake up and go to sleep, what meals they would like as well as when and where they want to eat, etc.
  • Difficulty trusting a “stranger.” With increased vulnerability in older adults, it’s only natural for there to be some measure of distrust about inviting a new caregiver into the home. When working with a professional nurse registry, however, such as American In-Home Care, the referred care providers have been fully vetted for maximum safety. And, the senior maintains the option of choosing an alternate care provider if preferred for any reason. Seniors are often pleasantly surprised at how quickly a bond forms with their new care providers, leading to enhanced socialization, companionship, and overall contentment and wellbeing.
  • Feeling like a burden. After a lifetime of meeting their own needs and the needs of others, it can be hard when the tables are turned. One great way to redirect this concern is by sharing the joy it brings to the person providing care, who truly has a passion for helping others and finds satisfaction and purpose in his or her role as a caregiver.

For more tips to help a senior loved one accept – and even embrace – the idea of an in-home care provider, contact the Florida home care experts at American In-Home Care. For over 25 years, we’ve been the trusted choice for older adults in need of care at home, with a family of brands conveniently located throughout the state:

Contact us at the location closest to you to learn more about helping a loved one remain independent and safe in the comfort of home.

State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661

The Impacts of Social Isolation on the Elderly During the Pandemic

Discover ways to help seniors overcome social isolation and stay engaged during the pandemic.

The Impacts of Social Isolation on the Elderly During the Pandemic

Social isolation and loneliness can be especially challenging for seniors during the pandemic. Learn ways to help keep seniors engaged, active and safe, right in the comfort of home. For nearly everyone, the coronavirus pandemic upended the way we live. Social and religious gatherings were suspended, face-to-face meetings with friends and family strongly cautioned, even trips to the grocery store or to run errands were seen as hazards due to potential exposure.
As communities begin to take tentative steps toward resuming some of these activities, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) continues to recommend that people who are 65 years of age or older and those who have severe underlying medical conditions like diabetes or heart or lung disease continue to practice social distancing and stay home as much as possible due to a higher risk for complications from COVID-19.
For many older adults, this continued disruption to a routine that, under usual circumstances, would include in-person interaction and social outings, presents added issues: health risks due to social isolation and loneliness. While loneliness and social isolation are sometimes used interchangeably, they are, in fact, different, but related, according to research conducted by the late John T. Cacioppo, Ph.D., former director of the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at the University of Chicago:
Social isolation: the objective physical separation from other people (living alone).
Loneliness: the subjective distressed feeling of being alone or separated.
The health impacts of social isolation and loneliness can be quite consequential and may include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Obesity
  • A weakened immune system
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Cognitive decline
  • Alzheimer’s disease

To help older adults successfully cope with the continuing upheaval to “normal” life, we recommend the following to counteract social isolation and reduce loneliness:
Outdoor activities: Research has shown that interacting with older adults outdoors is safer than being in closed, indoor spaces. Take advantage of our nearly perfect year-round weather in Florida and have a social distancing dinner or happy hour in the driveway or on the back porch. Go for a walk around the block or at a nearby park. Outdoor activities with a few select individuals are a great way to maintain in-person contact while still respecting social distancing guidelines.
Electronic communication: While a phone call is always welcomed, help a senior loved one install and use a video conferencing app. This is a great way to have a face-to-face conversation, especially if your loved one lives out of the area and you won’t be able to visit in person this summer. A small family gathering could be planned, too, by inviting relatives from around the country to join in on a video chat.
Hobbies and other pastimes. If your loved one has a particular hobby that has been put on the backburner, encourage him or her to engage in it again. Maybe a loved one is knowledgeable about your family history or has a lot of old family photographs that can be sorted. Taking the time to write and record information that can be shared with younger generations is vitally important. Consider other hobbies such as gardening, playing a musical instrument or knitting. Now is the perfect time to learn a new hobby, too.
Partner with a trusted provider of credentialed caregivers. Offering friendly and consistent companionship and care, our referred care providers can help older adults navigate these trying times and ward off feelings of isolation and loneliness. From planning engaging activities at home to preparing nutritious meals and assisting with personal care needs, we work with you and your senior loved one to make an ideal care provider match, considering not only the skills necessary to deliver expert care, but personality and interests, too.
Our family of brands has proudly provided trusted and reliable in-home care in Florida for over 25 years. With offices conveniently located throughout the state, learn more about the services we provide in the following communities:
American In-Home Care – Serving North, Central, and West Coast of Florida
Advocate In-Home Care – Serving Southeast and Southwest Florida
Douglas In-Home Care – Serving Treasure Coast
Whitsyms In-Home Care – Serving Southeast and Southwest Florida
Contact us today at the location nearest you and let us help a senior you love thrive in the comfort and familiarity of home.
State of Florida License and Registration Numbers: 30211518, 30211651, 30211295, 30211390, 30210978, 30211293, 30211382, 30211504, 30211733, 30211535, 30211531, 30211710, 30211709, 30211045, 5661